Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care


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There was a problem with saving your item s for later. You can go to cart and save for later there. Average rating: 0 out of 5 stars, based on 0 reviews Write a review. Jeune Guishard-Pine. Tell us if something is incorrect. Only 2 left! Add to Cart. Free delivery. Arrives by Wednesday, Oct 9. Pickup not available. This book is a guide to understanding the mental health needs of children in foster care and the role of foster carers and support networks in helping these children. The authors provide foster carers with an insight into the psychological issues experienced by children in the care system, and the impact of these issues on the foster family.

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Specifications Publisher Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Customer Reviews. Write a review. See any care plans, options and policies that may be associated with this product. Email address. Please enter a valid email address. Although this study represents the largest survey of VS provision to date, we acknowledge it is still based on the responses of 29 virtual schools.

Given the variety of provision, working roles and service structures evident across these virtual schools, we cannot necessarily view them as representative of provision across the country, since in general better response rates suggest a higher probability that the sample is representative Baruch and Holtom Indeed, some VSHs may have chosen not to respond because they felt that their provision was limited or not exemplary of good practice, or that others were unable to do so due to more limited staff or time resources.

However, the diversity evident within the achieved sample has helped to highlight the breadth of provision across a varied sample of virtual schools of different sizes and geographical locations. As such, it provides a valuable snapshot of evolving provision in the context of local priorities, that broadly reflects the current priorities of the National Association of Virtual School Headteachers. Our analyses also revealed that while most virtual schools felt they provided a good level of support to schools and CLA across the transition years, they were less satisfied with the support they were currently providing to foster families.

Evaluating the value of individual transition support as well as developing a focussed understanding of the barriers and facilitators to such provision would be timely, given that several virtual schools expressed a desire to develop or extend this, including mentoring. Within the school context, there is also a lack of research into DTs and their working relationship with VSHs. One study, focussed on joint working to support students at the end of secondary school, found that provision and experience of DTs varied greatly within a small sample Driscoll Therefore, further research into how best to consolidate and ensure consistency and best practice in these relationships, especially as children transition between schools, is required.

However, comparable educational under-attainment has been identified as an issue in many other countries as well Dill et al.

Talking to Children in Foster Care about Adoption & Permanency

It would be of interest to compare the role of the virtual school head and the approaches taken by virtual schools identified in this paper with other models of support in different countries and other parts of the UK. Virtual schools are working proactively at multiple levels around the child to address the factors affecting the educational outcomes of children looked-after. Virtual schools provide direct support, while also supporting resilient outcomes through close interprofessional working relationships and the development of supportive environments.

Much of their work goes beyond a narrow focus on raising attainment, to support many of the underlying psychological issues such as attachment, social and emotional understanding, relationships and well-being. Further research into how they support well-being and education is needed, alongside rigorous research into what interventions work best to guide VSHs as they make decisions about how best to support the children in their care.

Advice and support with design has been provided by Mary John at the School of Psychology, University of Surrey; Nikki Luke at the Rees Centre for Research in Fostering and Education, University of Oxford; and a steering group including foster carers, care leavers and representatives from virtual schools. Skip to main content Skip to sections. Advertisement Hide. Download PDF. Supporting the education and well-being of children who are looked-after: what is the role of the virtual school? Open Access.

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First Online: 28 March Resilience within an ecological systems framework Our analysis of VS practice across these transition years is framed by a resilience perspective, where resilience is viewed as a dynamic process involving complex interactions between personal qualities of individuals, supportive interpersonal relationships and broader structural and community support across the life course Hart et al.

Virtual school strategies and interventions Specialist direct work with CLA may be provided by the VS, as funding such specialist input within every single school would not be cost effective. The present study The current study was therefore designed with the following research questions in mind: 1 How do the services provided to CLA, foster carers and schools address not only educational issues, but also the broader psychological factors that influence educational outcomes such as mental health and well-being, attachment, peer and family relationships, social and emotional understanding, and behaviour across the transition years?

Survey description Participants were informed that the aim of the survey was to identify current provision within their local authority, with a particular focus on the support provided across the transition school years from primary to secondary school. Data analysis Free text responses were coded using NVivo10, a qualitative analysis software package that allows themes to be organised within a hierarchical structure. Service focus and provision We identified four key themes which will be considered in turn: enhanced learning opportunities, well-being and relationships, specific transition support and raising awareness.

Enhanced learning opportunities Many services were focussed on providing enhanced opportunities for learning to raise educational attainment. Direct work with CLA was frequently undertaken see Table 1 for examples and was identified in free text responses as a successful aspect of work by over a third of respondents, with the benefits of consistent, familiar support being emphasised across a diverse range of practice.

As well as supporting current levels of attainment, several virtual schools were involved in providing broader structural and community support to young people to enhance longer term learning. Much of this work involved raising aspirations and awareness of careers and providing connections to further or higher education opportunities. Table 1 Examples of direct provision to enhance learning opportunities. Well-being and relationships It was clear that virtual schools lead, fund or work collaboratively to support a great deal of work that also impacts on mental health and well-being, attachment, relationships, social and emotional understanding, behaviour and therefore the stability of home and school placements see Table 2 for examples.

Much of the work within this theme was focussed on the micro- and mesosystemic systems around the child. Some had also developed a network of close working relationships with other services enabling access to priority assessments or interventions to support well-being when required. Seven virtual schools directly employed educational psychologists within their team, and this role was viewed positively.

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Working closely with multi-agency teams that included mental health provision was also seen as successful, but direct employment of staff with a clinical or mental health focus was less common. Table 2 Examples of work supporting well-being and relationships. Specific transition support Specific support leading up to and during the transition period was frequently evident. The examples shown in Table 3 demonstrate that support could also be individualised; mentors and caseworkers were sometimes employed by the VS to provide a stable, familiar and consistent point of contact during this period of change.

Where transition mentors were employed, they could work with the pupil across transition and beyond in some cases, to build relationships and facilitate communication. Specific transition support during school holidays was a distinct form of support provided by a few virtual schools, which again had a broader emphasis on the socio-emotional preparation for a new school, and was one form of provision in which the peer microsystem was supported by VS practice. Table 3 Examples of transition support. Limitations and directions for further research Although this study represents the largest survey of VS provision to date, we acknowledge it is still based on the responses of 29 virtual schools.

Acknowledgements Advice and support with design has been provided by Mary John at the School of Psychology, University of Surrey; Nikki Luke at the Rees Centre for Research in Fostering and Education, University of Oxford; and a steering group including foster carers, care leavers and representatives from virtual schools. Ahrens, K. Youth in foster care with adult mentors during adolescence have improved adult outcomes. Pediatrics, 2 , — CrossRef Google Scholar.

Alink, L.

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Longitudinal associations among child maltreatment, social functioning, and cortisol regulation. Developmental Psychology, 48 1 , — Anderson, L. School transitions: beginning of the end or a new beginning? International Journal of Educational Research, 33 4 , — Banerjee, R. British Educational Research Journal, 40 4 , — Promoting emotional health, well-being, and resilience in primary schools.

Cardiff: Public Policy Institute for Wales. Google Scholar. Baruch, Y.

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Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction To Psychology For Foster Care

Survey response rate levels and trends in organizational research. Human Relations, 61 8 , — Bazalgette, L. Achieving emotional wellbeing for looked after children: a whole system approach. Bergin, C.

3.11.2 Fostering Service Duty

Attachment in the classroom. Educational Psychology Review, 21 2 , — Berridge, D. Looked after and learning: an evaluation of the virtual school head pilot. London: Department for Education. Educating young people in care: what have we learned?

Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care
Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care
Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care
Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care
Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care
Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care Understanding Looked After Children: An Introduction to Psychology for Foster Care

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